FAQ

Like wine, the flavor of olive oil may be influenced by several factors, from the kind of olives that are pressed (we use Picholine, Aglandau and Frantoio) to the type of soil and climate in which the olive trees grow. And of course, the care and dedication of the producer.

Throughout the world, there are approximately 90 varieties of olives used to produce oil, each with unique characteristics. For example, the Hojiblanca variety, found in the south of Spain, is known to produce a delicate oil with a subtle citrus flavor, while the Italian Frantoio variety from Tuscany (and growing on the Fortuné Arizzi estate!) produces an olive oil with a vibrant green color and intense notes of artichoke.

The climate and type of soil that olive trees grow in is key to the harvest, including the size of the olives and the richness of the oil they produce. Because harvesting takes place in the winter, frost and erratic temperatures can damage plantations, reducing the amount of oil each tree produces. Stony soils can also limit production, as they don’t retain water well.

It may be the most important factor in the quality of olive oil. A good producer monitors the crop throughout the year, adjusting water and fertilizer as needed for the development of fruitful trees. In addition, the producer will determine the harvest date, duration and storing conditions of the olives, and will oversee the pressing of olives into oil. Each of these steps will affect the quality of the finished product.

Yes and no. Refrigerating olive oil is not necessary and storage at room temperature is sufficient. However, it’s important to know that temperatures exceeding XX degrees farenheit will accelerate oxidation, so if you don’t use your oil for more than a week, the refrigerator will prolong its freshenss. If you choose to refrigerate, remember that the oil will solidify and you’ll be unable to pour it until it returns to room temperature.

Olive oil acidity is calculated after testing samples in a lab, and therefore cannot be determined by tasting. Extra virgin olive oil must have an acidity level of less than 0.8% after extraction, as this level naturally increases over time with exposure to sunlight and air. Moulin Fortuné Arizzi Olive Oil has an excellent beginning level of acidity at approximately 0.2% after extraction.

Olive oil acidity is calculated after testing samples in a lab, and therefore cannot be determined by tasting. Extra virgin olive oil must have an acidity level of less than 0.8% after extraction, as this level naturally increases over time with exposure to sunlight and air. Moulin Fortuné Arizzi Olive Oil has an excellent beginning level of acidity at approximately 0.2% after extraction.

Extra virgin refers to olive oil that is extracted from the first pressing of the olives and it’s the highest official olive oil standard you can find on the market. Two more criteria that determine quality olive oil are the level of oil acidity and a flavor score of 6.5 or greater, on a scale from 0 (worst) to 9 (best), by professional tasters. Moulin Fortuné Arizzi Olive Oil is controlled annually by official French organizations and has always received the label “extra virgin olive oil.”

Olive oil is best when bottled in glass. Plastic may be less expensive, but it tends to lend a taste to the olive oil upon opening and exposure to air. It is recommended that you transfer olive oil from plastic to glass in order to preserve its true flavor.

We’d be delighted to hear from you. Feel free to email any questions you may have to accueil@moulinarizzi.com. We’ll reply as soon as we can with an answer or guide you to the right resource.